5 Smart Email Marketing Tactics for Vacation Conversions


I have received many weekend emails via email marketing since the busy Black Friday to Cyber ​​Monday weekend. In this post I will share five that are particularly smart.

Combine email and physical mail

In November I was looking for a pair of slippers I saw in a store in Ireland. A quick Google search revealed the store and slippers, which I purchased on the store's website as the first customer. Fast forward a few weeks and was surprised to receive a $ 20 coupon in mine physical mail from the site owner.

I kept the coupon for a few days. In the end, I did not have an immediate need and reluctantly threw it in the trash. A few days later I received a reminder E-mail.

This email from The Irish Store came after the author received a physical letter via U.S. Mail.

This email from The Irish Store came after the author received a physical letter via U.S. Mail.

Had the Irish store simply sent a $ 20 off coupon via email, I may have quickly skimmed it and moved on. But since I got the physical mail and now the email I recognized the offer and was happy to have an electronic form that I could use when I needed it.

Using direct physical mail to reinforce email (and vice versa) is a great way to increase the response rate. I've tested this tactic with a few retailers. The result is a consistent revenue increase of at least 20 percent from buyers who receive both an email and direct mail compared to those who receive only one or the other.

Some points to consider:

  • Timing. Emails should arrive before and after a direct mail.
  • Language. The first e-mail should indicate that the physical mail is coming. The other should remind the recipients of the physical record and offer an opportunity to act online.
  • Offer. The offer should remain consistent with a deadline or expiration date highlighted in the second email.
  • Recognition. Track sales from those who are exposed to both methods regardless of what they bought from.

Countdowns and deadlines

One of the most effective tactics for increasing the conversion rate during the holiday season is to strengthen delivery time by reminding customers of how many days are left to trade.

This year I have seen convincing examples from the Old Navy and Williams & Sonoma. The subject lines and heads attract the shoppers to open and buy.

These subject lines and preheaters from the Old Navy and Williams & Sonoma can attract shoppers.

These subject lines and preheaters from the Old Navy and Williams & Sonoma can attract shoppers.

The head of the old marine email contains a countdown clock that tells readers how much time remains to get free shipping before Christmas.

Leave an overview email

Time-triggered emails can have the highest conversion rates. Abandoned browsing messages can catch buyers who for some reason did not place items in their shopping cart. Send the first abandoned emails shortly after the session. Then send some later, in a series. The emails should contain products that browse as well as suggested items based on the articles displayed.

The examples below are two abandoned emails I received from Wayfair. The first one contained the product I was looking at, a "Mini Pine Bouquet ….". The second email contained other product suggestions. Together, the two emails are an effective way to attract buyers back to the site.

The first Wayfair Browf Recovery email contained a product the author had seen.

The first Wayfair Browf Recovery email contained a product the author had seen.

Wayfair's other browser reset email contained recommendations based on the displayed item.

Wayfair's other browser reset email contained recommendations based on the displayed item.

Adaptation and correction

Adding the recipient's first name to the subject line can attract attention and increase open prices. However, with all customizations and dynamic content, there is a risk of errors if the database is incorrect. That's what happened to the first email from The Irish Store. My first name was incorrect. It listed "Fiona" instead of "Carolyn."

The Irish Store quickly issued an "Oops" correction on the subject line in the subsequent email. It caught my attention. The combination of personalization and a correction was effective – whether intentional.

The first email from The Irish Stores incorrectly author's name -

The first email from The Irish Stores erroneously the author's name – "Fiona" instead of "Carolyn." The other email – "Oops Sorry Carolyn" – was a correction, planned or not.

Repeats Emojis

For marketing via e-mail it is about sticking out in the inbox. To do so, some retailers use emojis in subject lines and foreskins. One tactic I've seen this season is the heavy use of repeated symbols, including some surprising ones. For example, in the subject line below, Wayfair used several large red "X" emojis in a row. It got my attention.

Wayfair repeats red

Wayfair repeating red "X" emojis is attentive.



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