Shutting down Coronavirus drives click and collect e-commerce


Even before the coronavirus-induced shutdown, e-commerce with click-and-collect grew rapidly. But now that many Americans stay home or stay away from flattening the Covid-19 curve, some unexpected companies are also taking online orders to pick up.

Let's start with some background.

Click-and-collect – also known as "buy online pick up in-store" or "BOPIS" – has been quickly adopted.

According to a statistics survey in July 2019, for example, 66 percent of millennial respondents (about mid-20s to late 30s) worldwide used click-and-collect. Perhaps more impressive, almost half of the silent generation (mid-70s and up) and baby boomers (mid-50s to mid-70s) had also ordered online and picked up locally.

Statista reported that two-thirds of the millennials surveyed had purchased online and picked up the store.

Statista reported that two-thirds of the millennials surveyed had purchased online and picked up the store.

The various home stay and protection orders have forced many companies that are not immediately associated with click-and-collect or e-commerce to begin selling online for street pickup. These unlikely segments include restaurants, bars and marijuana stores.

Restaurants

Enrique's Mexican restaurant is located on Avenue E in Kuna, Idaho, a city of about 25,000, a few miles outside the state capital, Boise. Enriques may not eat good food by Manhattan or San Francisco standards, but its patrons would argue that it is the best Mexican restaurant in the area if not the entire state.

Restaurants that usually serve the customer's table side have transformed their companies to click and collect on the wall. Enriques in Idaho is one example.

Restaurants that usually serve the customer's table side have transformed their companies to click and collect on the wall. Enrique's in Idaho is one example.

But like almost every restaurant in the United States, Enrique's dining room is closed, and the business has exclusively chosen to take online orders for parking or local delivery.

This may be the least surprising business segment on this list. A gallop survey from the beginning of April 2020 showed that about a third of American adults ages 18 to 54 had ordered more restaurant openings since the shutdown.

Even when dining rooms re-open, restaurants like Enriques will probably continue to offer click-and-collect or delivery options.

Cocktails from bars

Many states have included liquor stores in their lists of important companies.

But sometimes you just long for the perfect rose water fun from the elegant little bar in the center. It turns out you may be able to order it. Many state governors have allowed bars to sell beer, wine and mixed drinks for pickup or even delivery.

An attached Mai Tai and rose water gimlet sitting in ice on the dashboard of a car.

An attached Mai Tai and rose water gimlet sitting in ice on the dashboard of a car.

Thus, bars that offered no form of delivery or click-and-collect e-commerce created before the Covid-19 restriction quickly created e-commerce websites.

Whether these establishments can sell drive-by cocktails when they have reopened their physical locations is unclear. But if consumer demand exists, you shouldn't be surprised if at least a few progressive states allow it.

Marijuana

"The marijuana industry embraces change," wrote Trevor Hughes in April 20, 2020, USA Today edition.

“The stores are effectively closed. Instead, customers order online and pick up the curb, a major shift from when each buyer needs to be personally verified by a licensed store worker, ”Hughes continues.

Click-and-collect marijuana would have been unlikely just a few months ago, especially since the US government considers marijuana a Schedule 1 drug – "a high potential for abuse." Nevertheless, the pot is now sold in click-and-collect style on the sidewalk or delivered in some states directly to the customer's door in response to an order online.

Not all marijuana orders on the wall are technically click-and-collect e-commerce because marijuana dispensaries often only accept cash payment. Since the drug is still illegal federally, most banks will not do business with pot sellers, which means no credit card processing.

A marijuana store that finds a local bank or credit union to work with may still have to charge a convenience fee, which is not popular with pot consumers.

However, the corona virus can change this.

"U.S. The CEO of cannabis says that the chances of legalizing federal marijuana will dramatically increase as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, after several states declared dispensaries as essential companies, allowing them to remain open under orders for homes aimed at stopping the spread of the virus, " Frank Holland wrote in an April 19, 2020, CNBC article.

CEO Holland referred to includes the top executives at Cresco Labs, Curaleaf and Green Thumb Industries, all of whom produce cannabis.

These and many other industry experts believe there are some good reasons why marijuana will soon become legal nationally and that pot-e-commerce may be real.

First, several states designated marijuana dispensaries as "important companies" during the Covid-19 closure. Only this status can help the pot industry fight for universal American legalization.

Subsequently, the sale of recreational marijuana may represent a new source of tax revenue for state cash. For example, some estimates Legalizing the recreation pot in the state of New York could generate $ 1.3 billion in annual tax revenue.

If made nationally, click-and-collect marijuana can stick around.

If made nationally, click-and-collect marijuana can stick around.

Finally, cash can be considered dangerous. Some in the cannabis industry claim that physical currency spreads coronavirus. Thus, making it easier for marijuana sellers to access banks and contactless payments can be a health problem.



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